Thursday, April 6, 2017

The far hills of home and a quick flood

One of the good things about living near a mountain range is you can refer to them in the distance to get an idea of where you are (when you've been idly driving just looking at the countryside and not taking a lot of notice of which road you are on).  All I can tell you is this photo was taken out the back of Waikiekie somewhere.  I'd stopped because I liked the look of the farm track threading its way through the land.


Fortunately for us we weren't in the direct path of ex Tropical Cyclone Debbie when she finished rampaging down the Queensland Coast causing so much heartache and destruction, then crossing the Tasman Sea to whip her tail at New Zealand.  What a monstrous beast she was.  Although only a shadow of her former self she still has the power to wreck havoc on communities.  (At the moment a small North Island town of 2,000 is being evacuated due to flooding and she has moved south to the South Island.)  She dumped a terrific amount of rain on us in a very short time and the many little streams running down out of the mountain turned into raging torrents.  In little Pikiwahine Stream which runs through this farm she took a bridge with her, uprooted trees and flattened everything in her path.  In ten years we've never seen so much damage along this little waterway.


I wonder if this is the last photo I will get of this little farm bridge that is down along the road a bit.  It has been slowly disintegrating with each flood.


This is a photo I took of the same bridge after a flood in April, 2014.


Yes, we live in an area where it does sometimes flood.  The price to pay for living on the banks of mountain fed waterways.   But it has been ages since the last one, so it's not all bad.

7 comments:

  1. ...what a beautiful green countryside. Rain is a good thing, but sometimes you can get too much of a good thing.

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  2. It is amazing the power that water has. A lot of times, in this one area we use the power plant, or the steam rising from it, to have an idea of where we are. LOL

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  3. Barbara said she didn't realise how much she used Mount Cootha in Brisbane for orientation until she moved to Wagga where there's nothing similar to help you
    with directions.

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  4. I like the track in that first image too.

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  5. I suppose no matter where we live there will be risks. You have a beautiful area to live in and wait on the risks.

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  6. Water will have its way, and such storms are scary.

    Having never lived in the mountains, i hadn't thought about being able to track your location that way!

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  7. That all sounded very scary Pauline. Your scenery however is gorgeous. We had a young relative visiting us a while ago from mountain country, and the one thing he was having a hard time getting used to was that there were no mountains for him to get his sense of direction.

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