Saturday, October 4, 2014

Peanuts

The three 43 metre high silos are landmarks you can't miss in Kingaroy.  I was thinking of them as full of peanuts but at this time of year they were probably empty, just a rather grand reminder of the upcoming peanut crop.


Kingaroy is known as the "Peanut Capital of Australia" because Australia's largest peanut processing plant is located here.

The name Kingaroy is derived from the aboriginal word for "Red Ant" (Kingaroori) because of a unique species of ants found in the area which have adapted to the natural colour of Kingaroy's distinctive rich red soil.


Droughts and uncertainty surrounding the region's annual peanut crop has led some farmers to diversify from peanuts and grow grapes.  The rich volcanic soil, hot dry summers and cold winters has proved to also be ideal conditions for grapes.  I didn't know that or would have tried a drop of the local brew.   Kingaroy often records some of the coldest temperatures in Queensland during winter.  And spring, too, from my experience.  The night I stayed there the temp dropped to 4C.


The region is quite picturesque with extensive farmlands interspersed with low rolling hills.  I'd love to see it after rain. 

In most of the small towns I passed through quite often the oldest and best preserved buildings were the pubs.  Kingaroy was no exception.  This one was my favourite. 


Kingaroy has a prosperous, almost cosmopolitan feel while still appearing to be a relaxed, friendly and informal country town.  The delightful lass who served my breakfast chatted away like I was an old friend.  Asked me was I a Grey Nomad (a retired person who travels independently and for an extended period, particularly in a caravan or motor home).  Oh, how I wish!!  

A little later I was standing near the silos, it was still before 9 am on a weekday morning.  Rush hour.


The evening before when I'd ventured out to find somewhere to eat it wasn't the food but the sunset that caught my attention.  Can't remember what I ate, can still remember that sunset.

 

The township has a population of around 8,000 people. 
 

15 comments:

  1. Great series of shots!
    I like the pic second from last the most.

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  2. A great post Pauline and I loved all your photos. Further south in Virginia they also grow peanuts. Passing those fields over the years I now know what it looks like and I remember being so surprised that those peanuts grew under the ground like potatoes.

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  3. Great shots today.
    That is a hell of a lot of nuts.

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  4. Grey Nomad. What a wonderful name, like you, I wish I could be just that. This looks like a relaxing and interesting town. Your waitress sounds like a fun addition to the population here.

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  5. Beautiful area with pleasant people.

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  6. Thanks, Indrani. I had to hurry to get out of town to get the shot without houses in the way. Lucky it's hot a very big town!

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  7. I remember now that I was surprised when I first saw that the crop grew under the ground, too, Denise. The shell really does lead one to think of them growing on a bush, doesn't it?

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  8. Sure is, Adrian. The old guy I met the next day would have been in heaven if let loose in one of those silos.

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  9. CiCi, there are a lot of Grey Nomads our age out there. And they always seem happy. I'm not surprised, it would be a great life.

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  10. I sure enjoyed the trip, Doreen. Wish it could have been longer.

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  11. What interesting stories are in little towns like that.

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  12. You can always find someone ready for a chat in those little towns, too, Tabor.

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  13. 8000 people: much small than Stornoway then....and it has traffic lights! I can remember the first traffic lights in Stornoway and the first roundabout. They cause total chaos for a while and one dear lady refused to go round the roundabout the correct way - she always chose the shortest route - and the police had a hard time with her (as did the rest of Stornoway's motorists. I love the red earth. It is how I remember Western Australia. I think from now on I shall call Adrian the Grey Nomad!

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  14. That rich red soil is wonderful! I have never been to Kingaroy... It's now on my QLD bucket list! Very interesting Pauline.
    I know I have said it before but your travel stories are fascinating. Grey Nomads are very common here in QLD.

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